Search
  • Clarke Wallace

THE WILD SIDE-PART 3

I had no intention of adding another section to the Wild Side had I not been handed two wonderful booklets from the David Suzuki Foundation about wildflowers attracting pollinators. Bees, birds, bugs and the likes seeking out wildflowers for a noonday snack.


I opened with : ‘Native plants provide seed and berries for birds and nectar and pollen for insects like bees and butterflies.’


Here it is in a nutshell:


-- Wild strawberries: small white flowers found in clusters developing into red and juicy buds after pollination. Bees and butterflies collect pollen and nectar from them.


-- Chokecherries and wild black cherries: Round white petals. They grow in a variety of soils. Attract bees, butterflies, beetles and flies.


-- Columbine: Large red nodding flower. They attract the usual suspects plus especially hummingbirds.


-- Pussy willow: a Spring favorite. Butterflies go for the nectar; bees go for whatever nectar is available at the time.


-- Anemone: Large white or greenish flower. The pollen attracts many types of bees.


-- Goldenrod: Yellow flowers ‘in curved, one-sided clusters’. And this quote: “Goldenrods are thought (by some) to cause hay fever but this is not true. Ragweed is the common culprit.”


There are many more wild plants mentioned, which makes a good, interesting read. Most can be grown by seed.


Author’s comment: That’s only half the story. The other booklet is a guide to common pollinators, ones found in the both the European Union and North America. This will come in Part Four. Stick with it. Breakfast under the trees provided by members of The Woodbridge Horticultural Society.

4 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

I’ve been asked on numerous occasions how to write a book or screenplay. I’ve answered it several times here and my response is the same: Sit down and do it. Let’s take working on a manuscript for a b

I’m lucky enough to have floor-to-ceiling double doors in my home office. I look out on a small forest of trees. Just beyond the deck. Bluebirds, robins,

There was this little ant crawling across the living room on the oak floor. It seemed to be minding its own business when I gently brought a finger close yet not touching it. He/she, whatever, knew so